Tag Archives: School

So, finally they’re on the road! Our friends, the Reichert family, have now left old jobs and schools behind them and are now full time travelers! After having dreamed about it, talked about it and worked hard for it, their new journey (in every aspect) has now started.
We’ve just had them visiting on their way up north. And not just north btw, but about as far up as you can get on this earth, northern Norway.  If you’ve been following us here you probably know that for this family, it’s all about oceans and photography and this passion is what will be leading their way now.  They have now taken the leap to live on what they love and their first project will be to meet with a marine biologist in Lofoten and do a project together with her. I think this is so great and when they were here, we talked a lot about all the things you can do and learn from when you travel together full time as a family. How everybody can participate on different levels in projects and fill a function, how what you do feel “real” and how your family feels “whole”.  I also love how Gabi, the mother, expresses it when she talks about how they’re into this together, all five of them, which, in the world of photography, obviously isn’t  the most common thing, and if people don’t like that, too bad for them…
We ourselves have done many, (well, most) things together as a family and it has been interesting to see peoples surprise many times when they expect you to be there as one adult and we turn up all five of us 
Well, I’m really looking forward to see their new photos. If you haven’t seen what they have done before, you must have a look at some amazing pictures here, in one of our previous posts about them.
By the way, Gabi, the mother, recently won a very big photo contest with one of her seaweed pictures (I wasn’t to surprised )
To me, it’s just so inspiring to meet with people who take what they love so seriously so they take the leap. I think it’s fantastic, and courageous; to actually leave a safe income, school, family and friends to do something more with their lives than just living an everyday life (and longing for something else) and I wish them everything good on their journey. May they find great places and people along the way, sell loads of pictures that’ll give joy and inspiration to others and just have lots of fun together!
For more pictures check out their blog (and if you read German you can also follow what they write )

So, finally they’re on the road! Our friends, the Reichert family, have now left old jobs and schools behind them and are now full time travelers! After having dreamed about it, talked about it and worked hard for it, their new journey (in every aspect) has now started.

The Reichert family – full time travelers

Full time travelers – Gabi, Gunter and the kids Esra, Noah and Ami with their campervan just leaving our place to travel up north

We’ve just had them visiting on their way up north. And not just north btw, but about as far up as you can get on this earth, northern Norway.  If you’ve been following us here you probably know that for this family, it’s all about oceans and photography and this passion is what will be leading their way now.  They have now taken the leap to live of what they love and their first project will be to meet with a marine biologist in Lofoten and do a project together with her. I think this is so great and when they were here, we talked a lot about all the things you can do and learn from when you travel together full time as a family. How everybody can participate on different levels in projects and fill a function, how what you do feels “real” and how your family feels “whole”.  I also love how Gabi, the mother, expresses it when she talks about how they’re into this together, all five of them, which, in the world of photography, obviously isn’t  the most common thing, and if people don’t like that, too bad for them…

We ourselves have done many, (well, most) things together as a family and it has been interesting to see peoples surprise many times when they expect you to be there as one adult and we turn up all five of us :-)

Well, I’m really looking forward to see their new photos. If you haven’t seen what they have done before, you must have a look at some amazing pictures here, in one of our previous posts about them.

By the way, Gabi, the mother, recently won a very big photo contest with one of her seaweed pictures (I wasn’t to surprised :-) )

To me, it’s just so inspiring to meet with people who take what they love so seriously so they take the leap. I think it’s fantastic, and courageous; to actually leave a safe income, school, family and friends to do something more with their lives than just living an everyday life (and longing for something else) and I wish them everything good on their journey. May they find great places and people along the way, sell loads of pictures that’ll give joy and inspiration to others and just have lots of fun together!

For more pictures check out their blog at www.blog.5reicherts.com (and if you read German you can also follow what they write :-) )

One of Gabi’s photos

One of Gabi’s photos

Enhanced by Zemanta
It may sound a bit provocative, but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.
Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.
We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?
Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?
Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.
Here are a few of the things they brought up:
Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole wagon full of Amish
Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.
By the way, what would you like your kids toIt may sound a bit provocative, but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.
Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.
We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?
Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?
Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.
Here are a few of the things they brought up:
Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole wagon full of Amish
Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.
By the way, what would you like your kids to experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?
experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?

Well, maybe we don’t have to take it to the extreme here:), but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.

Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.

We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?

Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?

Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.

Aurora with a bread fruit in Kerala, India

Aurora with a bread fruit in Kerala, India

Helping friends with the olive harvest in the mountains north of Marbella, Spain

Helping friends with the olive harvest in the mountains north of Marbella, Spain

Aron in the ”French” part of New Zealand – the cute little town Akaroa

Aron in the ”French” part of New Zealand – the cute little town Akaroa

Here are a few of the things they mentioned:

  • Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
  • Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
  • Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
  • Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
  • Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
  • Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
  • Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole carriage full of Amish
  • Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
  • Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
  • Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
  • Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
  • Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
The girls with friends participating as volunteers at the Children’s Book Festival, Nanaimo, Canada

The girls with friends participating as volunteers at the Children’s Book Festival, Nanaimo, Canada

I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.

By the way, what would you like your kids to experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?

Enhanced by Zemanta

A while ago we asked the question why is families that do long term travel so uncommon? Judging from the feedback we got, school and money are definitely the most common reasons that stand in the way. Well , for most people money is usually the most popular reason but when it comes to families , then school is just as important.

Long term travel offers many real life opportunities for learning <br> Today we learn about the Alhambra...

Long term travel offers many real life opportunities for learning - Today the Alhambra, Tomorrow???


This hasn’t been the case for us since we have homeschooled most of the time even when we haven’t been traveling but we can very well understand the worries that may arise since we ran into the same kind of concerns when we started homeschooling our children. Could we do it? Would they learn anything? How about friends? And on and on… Not to mentioned how family, friends and even authorities here in Sweden were questioning our decision.

Being questioned like that we of course had to take a closer look at all these worries to see if it made sense to us or if we were just being crazy. We spent a lot of time, years and years, reading and studying the subject of schooling and how children (well ,everybody) learns.

To be honest the conclusion we came to is that school is probably not the best place for an ideal learning situation. We don’t want to be disrespectful of all the teachers and all the people working so hard in schools trying their best to teach children. It is just that the school system in itself is not the perfect set up.

Learning is a natural ability. We learn all the time from everything that is around us and from all that happens to us. We learn from seeing, doing, hearing, reading, and experiencing things. We learn from our failures as well as from our successes. We learn by asking as well as by answering questions. We learn by free will without even being asked to. We learn all the time without even thinking about it. Learning is a lot of fun and not a struggle.

In my personal opinion , by making school compulsory and forcing children to learn against their will, you start off on the wrong foot. You run into a constant uphill battle where the teachers try to motivate the children to learn by offering rewards or threatening with punishments. A human natural behavior is turned into a forced one and the joy of learning goes out the window. And the sad thing is, I believe, that is what happens when children start school. They start first grade happy and eager to learn and after a year or two the light in their eyes have gone out and learning is boring.

I could see this in my own life. And it was not until we started homeschooling our own children and saw the enthusiasm with which they embraced learning that I rediscovered my own joy for learning.

Sorry if I got a bit carried away there. It’s just that learning has become a subject that is very close to my heart. It makes me happy to see kids enjoy learning. And I also want to inspire others to rediscover their joy of learning just like I did

Am I getting of topic here? Not really because what we also discovered is that traveling is a great way of learning, probably one of the best. When traveling, you are constantly faced with new situations and circumstances. And every new situation is a new learning opportunity. The amount of learning that happens when you are out traveling can never be achieved in a classroom. And the amazing thing is that we have had reports from families saying that even if the children for instance have done no math exercises during their whole 6 month journey their understanding of math have still improved and they have no problem keeping up. Rather the opposite, they have very often moved ahead of the rest of the class!

So what I am trying to say here is: Don’t let school be a reason that stops you from long term travel. On the contrary, let your children’s education be the reasons why you need to go on that journey. Give them a real understanding of the world which I am sorry to say they won’t find in text books in a class room.

Somewhere you can find a lot of good stuff about long term travel and learning is on the Soultravelers3 blog.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

There always seem to be something stopping us from going on that long term journey. For some of the families we meet, the reason is that their children are too young. “It will be better when the kids are older and can manage more by themselves and will be old enough to enjoy the experience”. Ironically though, for the next family we encounter the reason can be quite the opposite, that the kids are too old. “They have their school work and their friends which they don’t want to leave”.

Writing in the olive tree in Spain

Writing in the olive tree in Spain

For us personally, school has never been an issue since we’ve been homeschooling. Well, that is not perfectly true. At the time of our first long term journey, our oldest daughter, Viktoria, was actually attending school and it was a bit of an issue for her to leave her friends there.

For us the parents, it was a surprise to be confronted with what power the idea of schooling has over our society. When we told the teacher that we were taking Viktoria out of school to go on a 6 month journey, we were told that we needed his as well as the school boards permission! Realizing that the school authorities could claim to overrule our decision was chocking to us. How ignorant we were…

Anyway, what was more interesting for us during that first long term journey, was the possibility we got to compare class learning to real life learning. Like most people we were convinced that school was something that everyone had to go through in order to learn anything. We had never even really questioned the fact that learning was something that had to be done in a school setting, more or less.

That first long term journey changed it all for us. Just to witness all the fantastic learning that happened was an awakening for us. All the different languages, cultures, climate, nature, wildlife, distances, currencies, exchange rates, social behaviors and lots of other things. And all the different people we met and their varying customs we experienced was definitely a crash course in socialization.

Who says you have to be sitting in a room on a chair to study? The options are endless, reading in a pool in Fiji for instance.

Who says you have to be sitting in a room on a chair to study? The options are endless, reading in a pool in Fiji for instance.

The biggest insight for us though, was when we got back home and Viktoria returned to her school. We then realized, that while Viktoria and our whole family had been out exploring and learning in the world, her classmates had spent all their time in the same class room. That’s when it became clear to us how limited the school world can be and that was when we started our search for something else.

We are not saying that homeschooling, our choice, is the right way for everybody. But we do believe that school by no means should be an obstacle for taking your children for a long term journey and exploring the world. The question is not if you dare to take them on this adventure but rather if you dare not to.

To find out more read our Children and School and School Ideas page.

Taking Viktoria out of school at that time impacted our lives and our whole way of living. We’re very glad we did it and grateful for having had the opportunity to do it. To travel as a family is a fantastic way of connecting and of learning and we just wish and hope more families could experience this.

So, if you dream about traveling with your family – just go for it.:grin:


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
  • Our Books

    Our book is available both as paper back and as an eBook

    Read more and order here...

  • e-Course

    We have just created this amazing support program for anyone who really want to make their travel dream happen. During eight weeks we will take you from discovering your travel dream to actually having it all set up so you will be ready to go.

    This first opportunity is on the 27th of October and is offered at a substatially reduced price. If you want to join us hurry up because it is already starting to fill up and spaces are limited...

    Read more about it and book your place here...

  • Talks

    To share from of our own traveling independent lifestyle and to encourage and support families (well, anybody) to act on their dreams of doing something different, like a longer journey, we offer two different talks, in Swedish or English:


    Read more about them here...

  • Coaching

    Are you seriously considering taking yourself and your family on that journey of a lifetime, but have now idea where, or how, to start?

    To strengthen your inner as well as your outer supporting systems and to help you find solutions you, at the moment, may not even imagine exist, we have created our special Travel Coaching Program.

    Find out more about it here...