Tag Archives: children

I’m sitting here with a box full of books beside me. Not any books though – our own book! It’s an amazing thing, being able to hold it in your hands after all this time of talking about it, planning and working with it.
book
You could without exaggeration call it a 5 year plan – we started brainstorming around it in 2005 :) More exactly on Viktoria’s 17th birthday when we were sitting in the café at Thursday Plantation, the Tea Tree Oil place south of Byron Bay, Australia. I remember it well, we had been traveling around the world for some months and were discussing, again, all these questions people always ask us when we’re away. Like;

How do you get the money to travel?

How do you have the time?

What about the children’s school and

How could you travel when you have a job?

We’d all heard them more than once :) and realized that what people really want to know with all these questions, is how they could do it too. How they could leave their jobs for a while, let the kids take a break from school, find the means to go on a 6 month trip and maybe create a more independent lifestyle in general.
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Anyway, that day, at the café, someone (jokingly) came up with this idea that we should write a book with our answers and then we could just give it to people. We first just laughed at the idea but then started thinking that it actually didn’t seem like such a bad thing. And now see where it has led us, that discussion around the lunch table!

Our first attempt was our ebook, which already has been out for a while, you can find it HERE. But now we also have a “REAL” one, a paper book! It contains lots of information on how to make a reality of that long dream trip for any family – how you could travel – and also our ideas about why we think that you should. We really think that traveling around as a family is GOOD for you and want to do our best to help you get out there and see for yourselves.
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Here are some different links, depending on where in the world you’re living, or traveling :) and where you can check out the book and buy it.

USA – www.amazon.com & www.barnesandnoble.com/
Canada – www.amazon.ca
UK – www.amazon.co.uk
Germany – www.amazon.de
France – www.amazon.fr
Japan – www.amazon.co.jp
Sweden – www.bokus.com& www.adlibris.com

So check it out! Order it for yourselves and for your friends so they can go too or give it away as a Christmas present!

Happy Trip!

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So, throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover“
Mark Twain

Yes, we’re hiking around in new territory again. Not physically though (well, not by foot anyway).

We’re working on our first real book! Of course it’s about traveling – extended travel. Actually it’s a development of our e-book: “Extended World Travel – How to take a break from the rat race and travel the world with your family for 6 months – or more” and it will be out soon!!

We haven’t been too active with our blog lately, and this is the reason. We’re also starting to do talks soon here in Sweden. That’s also a totally new track for us and we’re very excited!

At the moment, most of our time goes into book editing and preparing slide shows and talks and we’ve spent lots of time lately looking at old paper photos and not so old digital photos. I thought I’d post a few of them here.

I must say, working with this, and looking at all the photos, brings back so many memories, as well a reminder of how quickly times goes. The kids are almost adults now and I’m so grateful for having been able to spend so much time together with them and to travel around the world as a family. We’ll have all those memories together, I’m sure (and of course, the photos :) )

Aurora collecting drinking water at our favorite spring in the mountains above Marbella, southern Spain

Aurora collecting drinking water at our favorite spring in the mountains above Marbella, southern Spain

Viktoria got her hands painted by some Berber women in Marrakesh, Morocco. She was fascinated by the different outlook of this well known can.

Viktoria got her hands painted by some Berber women in Marrakesh, Morocco. She was fascinated by the different outlook of this well known can.

Tiny Aron with huge cactus in southern Arizona

Tiny Aron with huge cactus in southern Arizona

Just arrived in Fiji – look how pale we are! And yes, we got way to sunburned :(

Just arrived in Fiji – look how pale we are! And yes, we got way to sunburned :(

“Our” bure (cottage) on Nacula Island, Fiji. Certainly wouldn’t mind spending some time there now.

“Our” bure (cottage) on Nacula Island, Fiji. Certainly wouldn’t mind spending some time there now

Aron in Mumbai, India. The sun’s almost in zenith and the shadow fascinated him (wouldn’t mind being there either:))

Aron in Mumbai, India. The sun’s almost in zenith and the shadow fascinated him (wouldn’t mind being there either:))

We saw this fantastic sunset at the beach in Newport, Oregon, USA

We saw this fantastic sunset at the beach in Newport, Oregon, USA

A while back, we wrote about Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman who travelled the world on their motorbikes. One of our comments about that was that when they went on their adventures they left their families at home :-( .

Ready for the big adventure...

Ready for the big adventure...


So today we were very pleased to hear about a similar adventure to their Long Way Down trip from Scotland to Cape Town, South Africa. This time though, it’s two Swedish families who are leaving from Sweden but with the same destination in mind. 4 adults and 4 young children under the age of 10 on this 8-9 months long road trip through Europe and Africa. They are not riding motorbikes though but two well equipped Land Rovers.

You can follow their journey that started today on: www.smallbigexpedition.se

It sure is an amazing adventure they´re setting off on. Maybe not something that all participants will remember but for sure an experience that will influence their lives in one way or another.

Please don’t be intimidated by this great adventure – it might not be for everyone. These families are well experienced travelers looking for something extra ordinary. For most of us though a more traditional long term journey will offer enough memorable experiences to satisfy us.

We hope to have a reason to come back and tell you more about this expedition and maybe also offer you an interview later on.

So, finally they’re on the road! Our friends, the Reichert family, have now left old jobs and schools behind them and are now full time travelers! After having dreamed about it, talked about it and worked hard for it, their new journey (in every aspect) has now started.
We’ve just had them visiting on their way up north. And not just north btw, but about as far up as you can get on this earth, northern Norway.  If you’ve been following us here you probably know that for this family, it’s all about oceans and photography and this passion is what will be leading their way now.  They have now taken the leap to live on what they love and their first project will be to meet with a marine biologist in Lofoten and do a project together with her. I think this is so great and when they were here, we talked a lot about all the things you can do and learn from when you travel together full time as a family. How everybody can participate on different levels in projects and fill a function, how what you do feel “real” and how your family feels “whole”.  I also love how Gabi, the mother, expresses it when she talks about how they’re into this together, all five of them, which, in the world of photography, obviously isn’t  the most common thing, and if people don’t like that, too bad for them…
We ourselves have done many, (well, most) things together as a family and it has been interesting to see peoples surprise many times when they expect you to be there as one adult and we turn up all five of us 
Well, I’m really looking forward to see their new photos. If you haven’t seen what they have done before, you must have a look at some amazing pictures here, in one of our previous posts about them.
By the way, Gabi, the mother, recently won a very big photo contest with one of her seaweed pictures (I wasn’t to surprised )
To me, it’s just so inspiring to meet with people who take what they love so seriously so they take the leap. I think it’s fantastic, and courageous; to actually leave a safe income, school, family and friends to do something more with their lives than just living an everyday life (and longing for something else) and I wish them everything good on their journey. May they find great places and people along the way, sell loads of pictures that’ll give joy and inspiration to others and just have lots of fun together!
For more pictures check out their blog (and if you read German you can also follow what they write )

So, finally they’re on the road! Our friends, the Reichert family, have now left old jobs and schools behind them and are now full time travelers! After having dreamed about it, talked about it and worked hard for it, their new journey (in every aspect) has now started.

The Reichert family – full time travelers

Full time travelers – Gabi, Gunter and the kids Esra, Noah and Ami with their campervan just leaving our place to travel up north

We’ve just had them visiting on their way up north. And not just north btw, but about as far up as you can get on this earth, northern Norway.  If you’ve been following us here you probably know that for this family, it’s all about oceans and photography and this passion is what will be leading their way now.  They have now taken the leap to live of what they love and their first project will be to meet with a marine biologist in Lofoten and do a project together with her. I think this is so great and when they were here, we talked a lot about all the things you can do and learn from when you travel together full time as a family. How everybody can participate on different levels in projects and fill a function, how what you do feels “real” and how your family feels “whole”.  I also love how Gabi, the mother, expresses it when she talks about how they’re into this together, all five of them, which, in the world of photography, obviously isn’t  the most common thing, and if people don’t like that, too bad for them…

We ourselves have done many, (well, most) things together as a family and it has been interesting to see peoples surprise many times when they expect you to be there as one adult and we turn up all five of us :-)

Well, I’m really looking forward to see their new photos. If you haven’t seen what they have done before, you must have a look at some amazing pictures here, in one of our previous posts about them.

By the way, Gabi, the mother, recently won a very big photo contest with one of her seaweed pictures (I wasn’t to surprised :-) )

To me, it’s just so inspiring to meet with people who take what they love so seriously so they take the leap. I think it’s fantastic, and courageous; to actually leave a safe income, school, family and friends to do something more with their lives than just living an everyday life (and longing for something else) and I wish them everything good on their journey. May they find great places and people along the way, sell loads of pictures that’ll give joy and inspiration to others and just have lots of fun together!

For more pictures check out their blog at www.blog.5reicherts.com (and if you read German you can also follow what they write :-) )

One of Gabi’s photos

One of Gabi’s photos

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It may sound a bit provocative, but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.
Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.
We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?
Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?
Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.
Here are a few of the things they brought up:
Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole wagon full of Amish
Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.
By the way, what would you like your kids toIt may sound a bit provocative, but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.
Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.
We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?
Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?
Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.
Here are a few of the things they brought up:
Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole wagon full of Amish
Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.
By the way, what would you like your kids to experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?
experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?

Well, maybe we don’t have to take it to the extreme here:), but our own experience from traveling with our kids for extended periods during many years has shown us how awfully much kids learn during travels. And most of the learning takes place in ways which a normal school situation never would be able to provide to them.

Of course traveling isn’t, for many reasons, something that suites everybody, and also in view of how our society is constructed, schools still fills a function. Nevertheless, what I really want to point out is the huge amount of learning that takes place in a child (and adult as well of course) when you’re out there traveling the world.

We have run across many parents who are concerned about what would happen to their kid’s education if they’d follow their desire to go on a longer journey. Would they fall behind? Would they not be educated “enough”?

Well, what’s the meaning of education in the first place? Is it not to learn about the world we live in and to prepare children for life? To educate them about how to function and how to survive – and thrive? How to socialize and cooperate and how to make this world a better place?

Anyway, the other day this was a subject for discussion in our family. It began with someone reminding us that they, the kids, learnt their basic English – in Spain! The discussion continued about other experiences they’d had while being on the road that provided them with lots of learning and the list got rather impressive.

Aurora with a bread fruit in Kerala, India

Aurora with a bread fruit in Kerala, India

Helping friends with the olive harvest in the mountains north of Marbella, Spain

Helping friends with the olive harvest in the mountains north of Marbella, Spain

Aron in the ”French” part of New Zealand – the cute little town Akaroa

Aron in the ”French” part of New Zealand – the cute little town Akaroa

Here are a few of the things they mentioned:

  • Being invited to a family in India who had he most amazing herb garden you could ever imagine with all the medicinal herbs in the world
  • Going on the train from Tanger to Marrakesh for eight hours and discussing life with all the Moroccans who shared our compartment
  • Assisting friends with the olive harvest in Spain and then taking the olives to the mill to be cold pressed and bringing our own super tasty oil back home to Sweden
  • Chatting with a local in Akaroa, New Zealand, who was a descendant from the French colonizing ships, and hearing all about the history.
  • Participating in a Bar Mitzwah in the old town Augsburg, Germany, in the only synagogue that survived World War 2.
  • Volunteering at a children’s book festival in Nanaimo, Vancover Island BC, Canada, with friends
  • Traversing the USA by train and interacting with a whole carriage full of Amish
  • Being stopped by a police in New Zealand for speeding and listening to him telling us all the local Maori legends
  • Gossiping with the locals on a small island in Fiji while making baskets out of palm leaves
  • Visiting a SOS children’s village in Kerala, India, which we are sponsoring and meeting the mothers and the children who live there
  • Entering Australia with a phobia for snakes and being cured by hearing Crikey – Steve Irwin –  himself telling you all about these “beautiful” animals
  • Going on a whale safari in Vancouver, Canada, and experiencing the Grey Whales just a few meters away from our little boat
The girls with friends participating as volunteers at the Children’s Book Festival, Nanaimo, Canada

The girls with friends participating as volunteers at the Children’s Book Festival, Nanaimo, Canada

I was happy to hear the kids talk about these memories with such joy and passion and I’m convinced these experiences will be with them for the rest of their lives.

By the way, what would you like your kids to experience and learn when you’ll go traveling the world?

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There is a common belief among many, who haven’t tried it yet, that your marriage or the relationship with your kids wouldn’t survive if you did some extended travel together. For us, this is not our experience at all. And neither the experience of almost all the travelers we have met throughout the years. On the contrary, the vast majority of them say that traveling together for longer periods can be a great way to improve relationships (those who don’t think so, often agree that their relationship wouldn’t have survived even if they’d stayed at home).

Dolphin

As we see it, extended travel is one of the best things if you want to improve relationships, and a great way to get a strong connection to your kids


In our everyday lives today, there’s not much time to look after our relationships. It’s not uncommon that couples hardly get the chance to see each other because of heavy working loads as well as other commitments. And many parents and children only meet in the early morning or late at night when they are already exhausted or stressed out. Living under these circumstances doesn’t allow much room to enjoy and improve close relationships and make them stronger.

One of the biggest advantages of doing some extended travel together is, as we see it, the possibilities to reconnect with people close to you and rediscover who they are. When you’re away with your near and dear ones, exploring the world, you’ll experience adventure and have lots of fun together and learn new things about yourselves and about the world. And most important of all, you’ll have time!

To spend lots of time together with your children is a good thing. The concept of small amounts of “quality time” doesn’t always work. Have you ever experienced having planned some really fun quality time like Christmas or Disneyland and it turns into a disaster? Expectations can be so high at occasions like that that there’s no way to live up to them.

Going away on a long journey gives you lots of time together. You get the good as well as the bad (whatever that is) and from the quantity time, you will get lots of quality time as well. The times we have spent traveling with each other and our children have almost exclusively been an absolute joy for us. It has brought us closer together and we now share lots of great memories. So for us, traveling has really been a way to improve relationships, and not only within our family, but of course also with friends as well and relatives who have been part of our trips in one way or another.

Traveling together has really helped us to create a strong family bond and if this is something you’re dreaming of too, we think there’s no better way than extended travel!

“I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.” – Mark Twain

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I’ve had some really interesting reading lately – my old journal from the first time we did some extended travel with our campervan in 1996. Wow, how times flies and how quickly you forget! The struggles we had! And so much fun! Although we had traveled a lot before that, this was the first time we were campers, in our own campervan and totally inexperienced at this. But we learned a lot :lol:.

This was the transport for our first extended travel experince

This was the transport for our first extended travel experince


Like how inappropriate it can be to go over some of the highest parts of the Swiss Alps in the middle of the winter. We started off in a big snowfall (and in the Alps “big” can really be an understatement) and had to put on snow chains (I mean, wouldn’t that have been a sign enough not to go?). Snow chains make the driving very slow though and after a while the roads got better and we took them off. As we wanted to save time (for what? I can wonder) we put the campervan on a train that took us trough the mountain instead of driving around it for 4 hours. Sitting safely on the train was actually a very nice part of this trip, but soon, after having arrived at the end station on the other side it really wasn’t very pleasant anymore. We were now very high up in a place where there was only one choice to go to if you wanted to go further. The road down was very steep and winding and suddenly it also became totally icy. We didn’t have the snow chains on now and the road was so icy, it just wasn’t possible to stop and put them on either. This was one of my life’s most scary moments I assure you! High up on an icy steep winding Alpine road with the whole family in a campervan which couldn’t stop. “I got all shaky” I have written in the journal, and I think that went for the rest of the family as well. Even though the kids were very young at that time, they got the seriousness of it all. Finally, a patch without ice appeared and Magnus could stop the car. We stopped to gather our breaths for a while and thanked the higher forces that we all were alive. Then, with the snow chains safely on and with the speed of a snail, we continued out of this steep icy nightmare.

Snow storm in the morning, Haut Nendaz, Valais, Switzerland

Snow storm in the morning, Haut Nendaz, Valais, Switzerland

Palm trees in the evening, Lugano, Ticino, Switzerland as well

Palm trees in the evening, Lugano, Ticino, Switzerland as well

After having passed through the amazing St Gotthard tunnel, 16 km long, we later arrived in Lugano, in the Italian part of Switzerland. We visited some old friends there and they were kind enough to let us borrow an apartment they had in the middle of this beautiful city. From snowstorms and icy roads, we were now surrounded by palm trees! All in the same country and just hours away!

Our trip continued after a few days and we went to France, where we rented an apartment in the old town in Nice for a few weeks over Christmas and New Year. Then, after France, finally our big goal: Spain! We were so happy to have gotten this far, and first of all we really wanted to visit Barcelona, in the northern parts of the country. To start out, we planned to visit Barcelona’s famous street “La Rambla”. Still inexperienced as we were at travelling with a campervan, we had the somewhat naive idea of just driving into the city and park somewhere along the famous street.

Finally having dinner after a long day of driving. Who says that extended travel is always easy

Finally having dinner after a long day of driving. Who says that extended travel is always easy

I quote from the journal here: “What chaos! Narrow roads and lots of traffic. We got lost before Barcelona. We got lost inside Barcelona. We got lost after Barcelona. Boy have we seen many industrial areas today! Finally reaching La Rambla there was nothing else to do than trying to turn around and get out of the city. Not a parking lot in sight big enough for half the size of our car even, well not a parking lot in sight at all. We gave up and continued without having set one foot in Barcelona. Had “lunch” in the car while driving – at 5 o’clock- bananas and candy! Horrible!”

The rest of that day continued in the same spirit with narrow steep winding roads (we now realized what a mountainous country Spain really is, had never thought of that during our visits there by plane), quarrelling exhausted kids (and parents) and finding ourselves lost a couple of more times. Finally, after having been driving for a whole day, we arrived at the campsite which was our goal for the day. We had then done 70 km!

I quote myself again: “Today I really question if we should go on further south?”

We did go on though. After having taken a couple of days to recuperate ourselves after this first driving experience in Spain, we decided to follow through with our plan, to go to the very southern part, Marbella.

And it’s just so interesting to read this today. And to know, in retrospect, that the rest of this trip actually turned out to be one of the best times in my life, and the rest of the family says the same! After this first challenging part of our trip (I assure you, this wasn’t the only things that happened :lol:) the remaining months of this journey was just like heaven. And I mean that!

Having finally reached our goal, Marbella in Southern Spain. The Mediterranean isn’t extremely hot in January though

Having finally reached our goal, Marbella in Southern Spain. The Mediterranean isn’t extremely hot in January though

So think about this: we were out doing some extended travel and had gotten so far, and we were relatively close to our goal, the South of Spain, and we were also on the verge of giving up. But we didn’t. We did stop for a while to just relax and let go of all the stress and frustration. We took a deeper look at what we really wanted and then recommitted to our goal and continued. Today, I can see this as such a great metaphor.

How often don’t we strive for our goals and on the way towards them are faced with one challenge after the other. At some point we are close to giving up – it’s just too much. We ask ourselves if it’s really worth it. And then, when we can’t take it anymore and are ready to surrender to the challenges , if we just let go for a while and detach, relax, get some new energy and recommit, we lay the grounds for amazing things to happen. If you think back on your own life, I’m sure you have your own memories of this phenomenon. And when you are in the situation of giving up on your dream, try to remember these situations, the times when you didn’t give up, and what that meant to the rest of your life!

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A while ago I wrote about “Travel with kids – challenge or opportunity” and since this is an area that’s dear to my heart, here’s some more.

To travel with kids is a lot of fun. You can take the opportunity to practice being a bit less serious for example

To travel with kids is a lot of fun. You can take the opportunity to practice being a bit less serious for example


Why am I so eager to convince you to take your kids on that dream trip of yours? Because it’s so worth it! For the kids and for you. I’m of course not talking about that short get away weekend by yourself or with your spouse. I’m talking about going traveling and traveling for a long time. When you travel with kids and go out into the world, there are a few things which could be good to have in mind though:

Take your time and travel slowly. Don’t be in a hurry. Be very generous with the time you reserve for both your travels as well as your stays. Also, trying to cram in as much as possible to see and do may not be the best starting position for a relaxed and fun family journey.

Adjust to the kid’s age. It is a totally different thing, traveling with an older teenager or with a newborn (and with one child or four ).The younger the kids (and the more there are of them), the slower the pace I would say. Really young children can keep themselves busy and be fascinated by small everyday things and you can take the opportunity yourself to learn from them and experience the world from this perspective. The older they get the more you’ll of course be able to communicate about what you want to do and where you’ll want to go. Here you have plenty of opportunity to practice communication and negotiation, or consensus, skills. And I mean that! See it as a way to strengthen both your kids and your own abilities to listen and to be considerate as well as to express your desires.

Be in the present. This is also something you can learn more about from your kids, and the younger they are, the better they can teach you. Traveling and being away from all the musts and should is the perfect time to practice mindfulness and just taking in what is. This is also the best way to keep kids calm and relaxed (not to mention yourself). And don’t worry, your trip won’t be uneventful and boring, rather the opposite (and you can be sure that all kinds of unexpected, unimaginable things will show up). You’ll learn how fascinating even the smallest thing can be and you’ll experience how it is to feel really alive.

Remember that “the journey is the goal”. Well, this is very connected to the ability to be in the present. When you’re in the present, you realize that everything that happens along the trip is part of your journey , not just the end destination some 2 or 4 or 7 months ahead. And everything that happens along way, all of it, that’s what the journey is about.

These are things we have been taught ourselves by our kids when we have been traveling with them and the more we have been able to follow this, the more relaxed and fun our trips have been.

I’m sure you recognize by now, if you have been following us for a while, our story from our first long term trip. We left Sweden in a very stressed state, having got rid of house, company, school as well as a bunch of limiting beliefs. Our trip out into the world, where we should be “free” and have the time of our life, continued in this stressed state. And everything went wrong. The campervan broke down, we got sick, got lost (on many levels), the kids were bored and were fighting….

Not until we could let go of the expectations of everything we were going to do and see and be as well as slowing down the pace considerably, things changed. And this took time. Several months actually. From there on, we were able to take the days as they came, we could really listen to each other (and hear) and we got better at seeing the big things in the small. Whatever we did, it always worked out in the best way because, whatever happened, it just was the best way. Yes, we did have the trip of our lifetime!

So to travel with kids can really be an opportunity to learn to live your life in the best of ways and of course, this approach does not have to stop when your trip is over. I think it’s a real advantage to be able to live in a more mindful way in our times, either you are travelling the world or being at home dealing with your everyday businesses.

Taking things as they come  - if the plane is delayed, you can always watch a movie

Taking things as they come - if the plane is delayed, you can always watch a movie

  • Our Books

    Our book is available both as paper back and as an eBook

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  • e-Course

    We have just created this amazing support program for anyone who really want to make their travel dream happen. During eight weeks we will take you from discovering your travel dream to actually having it all set up so you will be ready to go.

    This first opportunity is on the 27th of October and is offered at a substatially reduced price. If you want to join us hurry up because it is already starting to fill up and spaces are limited...

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  • Talks

    To share from of our own traveling independent lifestyle and to encourage and support families (well, anybody) to act on their dreams of doing something different, like a longer journey, we offer two different talks, in Swedish or English:


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  • Coaching

    Are you seriously considering taking yourself and your family on that journey of a lifetime, but have now idea where, or how, to start?

    To strengthen your inner as well as your outer supporting systems and to help you find solutions you, at the moment, may not even imagine exist, we have created our special Travel Coaching Program.

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